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Jeffrey W. Brennan (Jeff) has practiced exclusively antitrust law for three decades, including more than 20 years in private practice and nearly 10 years over two tours at the Federal Trade Commission, from 1985 to 1990 as a staff attorney handling mergers and from 2001 to 2006 as assistant director, then associate director, of the Bureau of Competition. His current practice includes merger clearance, antitrust litigation, investigations by the FTC, DOJ and state attorneys general, and counseling on competitor collaborations and many other antitrust compliance issues. Jeff’s clients cover many industries, with the highest number in the health care services and products sector. He is co-chair of the Firm’s Health Antitrust affinity group. Read Jeff Brennan's full bio.

The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) and Pennsylvania Attorney General (AG) have challenged the proposed combination of The Penn State Hershey Medical Center (Hershey) and PinnacleHealth System (Pinnacle) in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. The FTC complaint alleges that the combination would create a dominant provider, reduce the number of competing health systems in the area from three to

The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) and the Antitrust Division of the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) held a public workshop on February 24–25, 2015, to examine recent trends and developments in health care provider organization and payment models, and their potential effects on competition in the provision of health care services. A main message from

At the recent Antitrust in Health Care conference in Arlington, Virginia, representatives from the Federal Trade Commission and U.S. Department of Justice Antitrust Division discussed important health care and antitrust topics.  Speakers stressed that the Affordable Care Act is not an opportunity for anticompetitive consolidation and conduct.  Providers and payers alike should continue to analyze

During the last several years, the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) has taken an active role in antitrust enforcement in the health care industry, particularly with respect to hospital and physician group acquisitions.  Last week, the FTC held a two-day public workshop to examine new trends and developments in the health care industry related to professional

by Jeffrey W. Brennan

By rejecting the “scope of the patent” test and holding that reverse payment patent settlements “can sometimes violate the antitrust laws,” the Supreme Court of the United States subjects such settlements to greater antitrust scrutiny.  But, by establishing the rule of reason as the operative standard for adjudicating the cases, with