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Lionel Lesur advises domestic and international companies from a broad range of industries, as well as investment funds and top managers, in matters involving corporate and competition/distribution law. Lionel has experience in the negotiation of private mergers and acquisitions, leveraged buyouts (including management packages and long-term incentive plans), and complex commercial contracts. He has in-depth experience with European and French competition law, including international merger control and antitrust proceedings. Lionel also regularly advises clients in relation to distribution strategies and compliance programs. Read Lionel Lesur's full bio.

Since the entry into force on 1 October 2014 of the provisions of the “Hamon” law of 17 March 2014, which introduced class actions into French law in relation to consumer and competition law matters, only six class actions have been brought.

The first action was filed on the date the new law came into effect by the consumer association UFC – Que Choisir against Foncia, a real estate group, to obtain compensation for the service charges levied by Foncia. The most recent class actions seem to have been brought in May 2015 by the consumer association Familles Rurales: one against SFR, a network operator that allegedly misled consumers as to the geographic coverage of its 4G network, and one very limited action against a campground operator who forced campervan owners to buy new ones after 10 years if they wanted to keep their plots.

Class actions are clearly not as popular as had been hoped, at least not yet. Indeed, of the (only) six procedures brought before the French Courts, four were brought around one month after the law came into effect, and all relate to consumer matters. One action led to a €2 million settlement intended to compensate the damages suffered by 100,000 consumers who had been required to pay excessive charges for elevator tele-surveillance.

The limited attractiveness of class actions is probably due to the strict conditions for bringing an action under the Hamon law.


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