Consistent with Assistant Attorney General Delrahim’s speech on September 25, 2018, the DOJ released a new Model Timing Agreement which sets out that it will require fewer custodians, take fewer depositions, and commit to a shorter overall review period in exchange for the provision of detailed information from the merging parties earlier in the Second Request process than has previously been required.

WHAT HAPPENED:

  • In November, the US Department of Justice (DOJ) published a new Model Timing Agreement (the Model) much like the FTC’s model published earlier this year. Timing agreements are agreements between agency staff and merging parties that outline expected timing for various events (g., production of documents and data, timeline for depositions and front-office meetings if needed) and help provide clarity for the agencies to conduct an orderly investigation during a Second Request.
  • By providing this Model, the DOJ is signaling that it wants certainty on timing during its Second Request reviews and that this Model is a fast way for the parties and the DOJ to come to agreement on these issues.
  • Some highlights of the DOJ Model include:
    • Parties must wait 60 days after substantial compliance to consummate transactions and give 10 days’ notice prior to closing.
    • The Model limits the number of custodians to 20 per party and depositions to 12 per party, except in extenuating circumstances.
    • The Model reserves the DOJ’s ability to add 5 more custodians at any time prior to filing a complaint, with the requirement that parties must produce those individual’s responsive documents within 15 days or the agreed timing will be tolled.
    • For document productions, depending on production method (technology assisted review or linear review), all responsive, non-privileged documents must be produced approximately 30-45 days before substantial compliance. Production of potentially privileged documents ultimately deemed not privileged must be produced approximately 10-25 days before the substantial compliance certification date.
    • Most data productions are required 30-45 days before substantial compliance.


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On April 27, 2018, the United States Senate confirmed President Trump’s five nominees for Commissioners of the Federal Trade Commission (FTC). Three are Republicans: Chairman Joseph Simons, Noah Phillips and Christine Wilson, and two are Democrats: Rohit Chopra and Rebecca Slaughter. The Senate’s vote returns the FTC to a full complement of Commissioners for the first time under the Trump Administration. Of note to participants in the health care sector: the FTC shares civil antitrust law enforcement jurisdiction over the health care industry with the Department of Justice Antitrust Division, but takes the lead when it comes to the health care provider, pharmaceutical and medical device industries.
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With its latest lawsuit to block an acquisition of physicians, the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) confirmed last week that monitoring physician consolidation is a priority. The FTC and North Dakota Attorney General sued to block the proposed acquisition by a health system (Sanford Health) of Mid-Dakota Clinic (MDC), which both serve the areas of Bismarck and Mandan, North Dakota. The deal would allegedly create very high market shares in several physician service markets.

WHAT HAPPENED

  • Sanford Health is a vertically integrated health system, which operates a general acute care hospital in Bismarck and clinics providing primary care and specialty services. Sanford employs approximately 160 physicians who work in Bismarck or Mandan. MDC is a multispecialty medical practice employing 61 physicians who provide services in Bismarck.
  • Concurrent with its sealed federal complaint to preliminarily enjoin the deal, the FTC filed an administrative complaint that alleges that the transaction would create anticompetitive effects in four physician service markets: adult primary care services, pediatric services, Obstetrics and Gynecology (OB/GYN) services, and general surgery services. Sanford and MDC are the area’s two largest providers of each of those services; in general surgery, they are the only providers.
  • The complaint contends that the relevant geographic market is no larger than the four-county Bismarck, ND Metropolitan Statistical Area. The FTC alleges that this area encompasses the locations where, to be marketable to employers, commercial health plan networks must include physicians.
  • The complaint alleges that Sanford and MDC are each other’s closest competitors and that the combination would result in post-transaction market shares of 75 percent for adult primary care services, over 80 percent for pediatric services, over 85 percent for OB/GYN services and 100 percent of general surgery services.
  • The FTC rejects as unsubstantiated and not merger specific the parties’ claims that the transaction would yield significant cost savings and quality improvements. In any event, the FTC alleges that the claimed efficiencies do not outweigh the transaction’s likely competitive harm.


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