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Musical Chairs at the FTC—Ohlhausen is New Acting Chairwoman

This month has seen significant changes in the landscape of federal leadership and the changes have now reached the Federal Trade Commission (FTC). On January 13, current Chair Edith Ramirez announced that she would resign from her position effective February 10, 2017. This Wednesday, January 25, the new administration designated Maureen Ohlhausen as Acting Chair. Ohlhausen, a Republican, was one of two remaining commissioners at the agency, along with Democrat Terrell McSweeny.

Ramirez served as a commissioner since 2010 and chair since early 2013 by designation of fellow Harvard Law Review member, President Obama. She spent her early career as a litigator with Quinn Emanuel and focused on antitrust, unfair competition and Lanham Act work. From the beginning of her tenure as chair, Ramirez developed a reputation as a hard-working and effective leader who was experienced, even-handed and not afraid to bring mergers to court. As a Latina and the daughter of Mexican immigrants, Ramirez was the first member of an ethnic minority to oversee the agency. During her tenure, she also secured a number of high-profile wins for the commission.

Ohlhausen has been a commissioner since 2012, though she started at the FTC’s General Counsel’s Office back in 1997. She has also worked as an advisor to former FTC Commissioner Orson Swindle and has been Deputy Director and then Director of the Office of Policy Planning. Ohlhausen stated at a Heritage Foundation antitrust conference this month that “all signs point to a new antitrust policy.” She discussed narrowing the scope of “Second Requests” in merger reviews by making them more targeted and therefore less burdensome. She also expressed a priority of greater protection for intellectual property rights, complaining that the agency has been too quick to accuse standard essential patent (SEP) holders of anticompetitive behavior when suing to defend their rights.

Meanwhile, the new administration’s position on merger activity hasn’t been clear. While in October 2016, Donald Trump described the AT&T-Time Warner deal as “a deal we will not approve in my administration because it’s too much concentration of power in the hands of too few,” and said that Comcast’s acquisition of NBC Universal “concentrates far too much power in one massive entity that is trying to tell the voters what to think and what to do,” he has subsequently chosen advisers on telecom and antitrust issues who appear to apply traditional antitrust analysis that is more merger-friendly than the prior administration.

Republican and Former Commissioner Joshua Wright leads the new administration’s transition of the FTC. The incoming administration will need to find three new commissioners for the five-member panel. At least one of the three must be a Democrat. The new appointments will be very important to follow for clients considering mergers in the near future.




Terrell McSweeny Confirmed as Fifth FTC Commissioner

10 months after President Obama nominated her, Terrell McSweeny has been confirmed as the fifth FTC commissioner.  The vote was 95-1 for McSweeny with David Vitter, a Republican from Louisiana, voting against her nomination.

McSweeny’s confirmation marks the first time in history that four women have served as FTC commissioners at the same time.  It also gives the FTC its full complement of commissioners (now three Democrats and two Republicans), which may increase the number of matters that move forward to investigation and may help to resolve matters more quickly. A full panel of commissioners will be key in several upcoming large mergers, including a plan by food distributor Sysco Corp to merge with rival U.S. Foods Inc., and a proposed combination of grocery chains Kroger and Harris Teeter.

Prior to the FTC, Ms. McSweeny served at the DOJ on many high-profile matters such as the Anheuser-Busch InBev NV-Grupo Modelo SAB de CV merger and the merger between American Airlines Inc. and US Airways Group Inc.  She also worked on the DOJ’s e-books price-fixing suit against Apple Inc. and its work on the International Trade Commission’s decision to block the import of Apple Inc. products based on Samsung Electronics Co. Ltd.’s standard-essential patents.

Her experience at the DOJ will carry over to the FTC and will likely increase the cooperation between the two agencies.  Her prior work at the DOJ in particular, as well as at her former law firm, O’Melveny Myers, gives her experience on an issue the FTC is currently pursuing on patent assertion entities, pay-for-delay arrangements and privacy issues.

Previously, Ms. McSweeny advised three presidential candidates on domestic policy and related matters. In 2008, she worked for Vice President Biden in various capacities including domestic policy issues.




President Obama Announces Nominee for Commissioner, Federal Trade Commission

by Gregory E. Heltzer

On July 19, 2011, President Obama announced his intent to nominate Maureen K. Ohlhausen to serve as a Commissioner on the Federal Trade Commission.  Ms. Ohlhausen would replace Commissioner Kovacic, whose term expires September 25, 2011.  Ms. Ohlhausen has previously served at the Federal Trade Commission in a number of leadership roles (from 1997 to 2008), including as Director of the Office of Policy Planning and, earlier, as an attorney advisor for Commissioner Orson Swindle.  Earlier in her career, Ms. Ohlhausen worked at the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit as a law clerk for Judge David Sentelle and clerked for Judge Robert Yock of the U.S. Court of Federal Claims.  Presently, she is an attorney at Wilkinson Barker Knauer, LLP, where she is a partner in the firm’s privacy, data protection and cybersecurity practice.  She is also a senior editor of the American Bar Association Antitrust Law Journal and has taught privacy law and unfair trade practices as an adjunct professor at George Mason University School of Law.  Ms. Ohlhausen received a B.A. from the University of Virginia and a J.D. from George Mason University School of Law.




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