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Stephen Wu focuses his practice on antitrust litigation, defending mergers and acquisitions before antitrust enforcement agencies and counseling clients on antitrust compliance issues. He represents clients in a wide variety of industries ranging from aerospace to consumer products and food, with a particular concentration on health care antitrust matters. He is co-chair of the Firm’s Health Antitrust Affinity Group. Read Stephen Wu's full bio.

Manufacturers of optical disk drives defeated electronics companies’, retailers’ and indirect purchaser plaintiffs’ conspiracy claims after seven years of litigation. On December 18, 2017, the US District Court for the Northern District of California issued simultaneous orders that granted summary judgment in favor of defendants after finding that the electronics companies, retailers and indirect purchasers failed to demonstrate evidence of injury and causation.

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On October 20, 2016, the United States Department of Justice Antitrust Division (DOJ) and Federal Trade Commission (FTC) issued joint Antitrust Guidance to Human Resource (HR) Professionals (the Guidance) involved in hiring and compensation decisions. The agencies issued the guidance to educate HR professionals about how the antitrust laws apply in the employment context. 

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On September 27, 2016, the US Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit handed an important victory to the Federal Trade Commission and the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania in a closely watched hospital merger case. The decision provides clear guidance on the appropriate tests for determining geographic markets in hospital merger cases, while also suggesting that efficiencies claimed in many hospital transactions may face increased scrutiny in future cases.

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The ultimate effectiveness of the corporate compliance program depends on its ability to mitigate risks arising from all substantive laws materially affecting the company — not only the most visible or notorious ones. Yet, both experience and impression suggest that many health company compliance programs are primarily focused on addressing concerns arising from the anti-fraud and abuse, self-referral and reimbursement rules. This level of focus is understandable, given the historical prominence of these rules and the strong public voice of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Inspector General. However, such program imbalance can itself lead to significant compliance concerns given the increasing extent to which the civil and criminal antitrust laws are applied to the health care sector.

The fundamental purpose of a corporate compliance program is to detect the particular types of misconduct most likely to occur in a particular corporation’s line of business. The parameters of most programs are based upon the core “effectiveness” principles set forth in the Federal Sentencing Guidelines.[1] Specific details of particular programs often reflect guidance provided by regulators with particular interest in certain industries. For example, the compliance programs of many health industry companies follow DHHS regulations that set forth basic principles of such programs, and specific anti-fraud elements that companies should consider when designing and implementing their programs.

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The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) and the Antitrust Division of the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) held a public workshop on February 24–25, 2015, to examine recent trends and developments in health care provider organization and payment models, and their potential effects on competition in the provision of health care services. A main message from FTC and DOJ leadership at the workshop is that the agencies evaluate new provider and payment models for their adherence to competition principles, effect on cost of care, access and quality, and avoidance of market power.

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At the recent Antitrust in Health Care conference in Arlington, Virginia, representatives from the Federal Trade Commission and U.S. Department of Justice Antitrust Division discussed important health care and antitrust topics.  Speakers stressed that the Affordable Care Act is not an opportunity for anticompetitive consolidation and conduct.  Providers and payers alike should continue to analyze every acquisition, collaborative arrangement, contract or unilateral action under the traditional framework of antitrust law.

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During the last several years, the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) has taken an active role in antitrust enforcement in the health care industry, particularly with respect to hospital and physician group acquisitions.  Last week, the FTC held a two-day public workshop to examine new trends and developments in the health care industry related to professional regulations of health care providers, health information technology, new care delivery models, quality measurements and pricing transparency and how those developments may affect competition.  Health care providers should anticipate increased FTC scrutiny of these trends and how they affect health care costs, quality, access and care coordination.

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